Wilkie Collins Journal: Call for Articles

books_heartscience_lovell(Image courtesy of Andrew Gasson http://www.wilkie-collins.info/books_heart_and_science.htm#Plot)

 

The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries

 

Deadline for Abstracts: 28th February 2017

Deadline for Articles: 31st May 2017

 

‘“Why can’t I look into your heart, and see what secrets it is keeping from me?”’

 

The protagonist of Wilkie Collins’s Heart and Science (1883), surgeon Ovid de Vere, laments the difficulty in deciphering hidden emotions and secrets. Yet the language suggests his medical background, striking a note with the novel’s supposedly anti-vivisection message and highlighting contemporary debates into the nature of experimental medicine, observation and epistemology. What is the best way of uncovering secrets, and what part does knowledge of the body play in this? Can medical training benefit from a thorough understanding of emotion? And does gender play a part in this? Issues of ‘heart’ and ‘science’ reverberate across Collins’s work, from the Major’s collection of women’s hair in The Law and the Lady (1875) to Ezra Jenning’s solution to the crime of The Moonstone (1868). This conference takes as its focus the proliferation of “heart” and “science” throughout Collins’s work.

 

We welcome both abstracts and full article submissions on, but not limited to, the following topics:

 

  • Wilkie Collins’s Heart and Science (1883) and/or any of Collins’s work
  • The Body: As a scientific subject, as a site of emotion, bodily representations, and the body in forensics, news reportage and the home.
  • The Victorian origin of disciplines:Collins as an interdisciplinary figure, the divide (or not) of “heart” and “science”, the definition of sensation in literature and/or science.
  • Medicine and anatomical science:vivisection, taxidermy, anatomical atlases and the nineteenth-century doctor and/or scientist.
  • Psychology and psychiatry:the physicality of mental illness, hysteria, the asylum, treatment and therapeutics.
  • Gender: the gendered body, representations of gender, the gendered connotations of “heart” and/or “science”.
  • Sensation: As genre, as sense or emotion, as subjective.
  • Detection: forensics, interrogation, the body as clue, the science of detection, and crimes of the heart.
  • Relationships: Romantic, familial, or otherwise.
  • Neo-Victorian Approaches to “Heart” and “Science”
  • Work by other contemporary sensation writers

 

Submissions are not limited to papers on Wilkie Collins’s Heart and Science (1883) but to “heart” and “science” at work in the full range of Collins’s fiction. The WCJ are also interested in related authors and sensation fiction more broadly, hence papers on authors such as Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Charles Reade, Charles Dickens, Ellen Wood, Florence Marryat and other sensation writers will also be considered. Interdisciplinary perspectives are welcome.

 

Email abstracts to jo.parsons@falmouth.ac.uk and V.Burke@pgr.reading.ac.uk

by 28th February 2017.

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Programme: The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries

books_heartscience_lovell 

 

24th September 2016

Barts Pathology Museum, London

 

9-9.20am REGISTRATION

 

9.20-10.50 : Science in Society and Relationships

  • Karin Koehler (St Andrews): Heart, science and unhappy homes: Eliza Lynn’s Realities (1851)
  • Ceri Hunter (Mansfield College, Oxford): Cozening Cousins: Collins, Cousin Marriage and Sensation
  • Helena Ifill (Sheffield): Prosaic and Pathological: Love and Friendship in Collins’s Fiction’
  • Anne Chapman (King’s College, London):‘Keep your place, if you please’: order, privacy, and romance in ‘Miss or Mrs.?’

 

10.50-11.20am COFFEE BREAK

 

11.20am-12.20pm Keynote

  • Tara MacDonald (Idaho): Wilkie Collins, Armadale and Public Feeling

 

12.20-1.20pm LUNCH

 

1.20-1.50pm Performance and Talk

  • Jak Stringer (Rambles in Cornwall (http://bit.do/caXvp): The Influences and Relationships of Cornwall on the writings of Wilkie Collins

 

1.50-3.10pm: Differentiated and Troublesome Bodies

  • Ryan Sweet (Exeter): “[O]ld outspoken wig[s]”: Representations of Old Age and Artificial Hair in the Novels of Wilkie Collins
  • Clare Walker Gore (Selwyn College): Disability Pride and Disability Prejudice: Blindness and Blueness in Poor Miss Finch
  • Christopher Pittard (Portsmouth): Dangerous Dogs: Wilkie Collins’s Mr Lady’s Money and the 1870s Rabies Panic
  • Ann Loveridge (Canterbury Christ Church): Women and Scientific Ambition in Wilkie Collins’s Heart and Science and Florence Marryat’s An Angel of Pity

 

 

3.10- 3.30pm COFFEE BREAK

 

3.30-4.45-pm: Madness, Pathology and the Body : Interpreting the Pathologised Body

  • James Green (Exeter): “Straight through those clear blue eyes into his soul”: Physiognomy, Physiology, and the Detective Gaze in M.E. Braddon’s The Trail of the Serpent
  • Benjamin E. Noad (Sterling): “Mad-Speech” to infinity in Lady Audley’s Secret and Wilkie Collins’s Basil
  • Dana Woodcock (Washington): The Woman in White’s Response to the Rehabilitative Asylum Movement
  • Martin Edwards (Institute of Advanced Studies, UCL): Myths and narratives of therapeutic bed rest

 

Tickets available from: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-heart-and-science-of-wilkie-collins-and-his-contemporaries-tickets-25104106057

 

£20 waged

£10 student/unwaged

Plus a small processing fee

(William)_Wilkie_Collins_by_Rudolph_Lehmann

Call for Peer Reviewers

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The Wilkie Collins Journal invites applications for peer reviewers who are experts in the field of Victorian studies. The WCJ is dedicated to publishing and promoting quality research on Wilkie Collins and the field of popular fiction more widely, and peer reviewers play a key part in this. Peer reviewers will provide feedback to the editors about the merits of submissions in terms of quality and contribution to the field.  Reviewers are expected to write reviews in a timely, collegial, and constructive manner.

 

This is an excellent opportunity to contribute to a growing and well-regarded journal, as well as enhance your academic C.V. We are interested in attracting reviewers at all career stages, and welcome postgraduate students and ECRs to our team. All reviewers will be listed on our website:

 

If interested, please email a CV and list of academic interests to jo.parsons@falmouth.ac.uk and V.Burke@pgr.reading.ac.uk.

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CFP: The ‘Heart’ and ‘Science’ of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries

Call For Papers

Wilkie Collins Journal and Victorian Popular Fiction Association

books_heartscience_lovell 

(Image courtesy of Andrew Gasson http://www.wilkie-collins.info/books_heart_and_science.htm#Plot)

 

The “Heart” and “Science” of Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries

 Deadline for CFP: Friday 17th June 2016

 
Conference date: 24th September 2016

Location: Barts Pathology Museum, London

Keynote: Dr. Tara MacDonald (University of Idaho) ‘ Wilkie Collins, Armadale, and Public Feeling.’

 

‘“Why can’t I look into your heart, and see what secrets it is keeping from me?”’

 

The protagonist of Wilkie Collins’s Heart and Science (1883), surgeon Ovid de Vere, laments the difficulty in deciphering hidden emotions and secrets. Yet, the language suggests his medical background, striking a note with the novel’s supposedly anti-vivisection message and highlighting contemporary debates into the nature of experimental medicine, observation and epistemology. What is the best way of uncovering secrets, and what part does knowledge of the body play in this? Can medical training benefit from a thorough understanding of emotion? And does gender play a part in this? Issues of ‘heart’ and ‘science’ reverberate across Collins’s work, from the Major’s collection of women’s hair in The Law and the Lady (1875) to Ezra Jenning’s solution to the crime of The Moonstone (1868). This conference takes as its focus the proliferation of “heart” and “science” throughout Collins’s work.

 

We welcome proposals on, but not limited to, the following topics:

 

  • Wilkie Collins’s Heart and Science (1883) and/or any of Collins’s work
  • The Body: As a scientific subject, as a site of emotion, bodily representations, and the body in forensics, news reportage and the home.
  • The Victorian origin of disciplines: Collins as an interdisciplinary figure, the divide (or not) of “heart” and “science”, the definition of sensation in literature and/or science.
  • Medicine and anatomical science: vivisection, taxidermy, anatomical atlases and the nineteenth-century doctor and/or scientist.
  • Psychology and psychiatry: the physicality of mental illness, hysteria, the asylum, treatment and therapeutics.
  • Gender: the gendered body, representations of gender, the gendered connotations of “heart” and/or “science”.
  • Sensation: As genre, as sense or emotion, as subjective.
  • Detection: forensics, interrogation, the body as clue, the science of detection, and crimes of the heart.
  • Relationships: Romantic, familial, or otherwise.
  • Neo-Victorian Approaches to “Heart” and “Science”
  • Work by other contemporary sensation writers

 

Submissions are not limited to papers on Wilkie Collins’s Heart and Science (1883) but to “heart” and “science” at work in the full range of Collins’s fiction.

The WCJ and VPFA are also interested in related authors and ‘sensation fiction’ more broadly, hence papers on authors such as Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Charles Reade, Charles Dickens, Ellen Wood, Florence Marryat and other sensation writers will also be considered. Interdisciplinary perspectives are welcome.

 

Email abstracts to jo.parsons@falmouth.ac.uk and V.Burke@pgr.reading.ac.uk

by 17th June 2016.

 

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‘Werewolves: Studies in Transformations’

 

 abstracts: 30th November 2015, full submissions: 31st March 2016

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Dr Janine Hatter and Kaja Franck, ‘Revenant: Critical and Creative Studies of the Supernatural’


contact email:

j.hatter@hull.ac.uk / k.a.franck@gmail.com

 

‘Revenant: Critical and Creative Studies of the Supernatural’ is a peer-reviewed, online journal looking at the supernatural, the uncanny and the weird. Revenant is now accepting articles, creative writing pieces and book, film, game, event or art reviews for a themed issue on werewolves (due Autumn 2016), guest edited by Dr Janine Hatter and Kaja Franck.

 

Werewolves have been a consistent, if side-lined, aspect of supernatural studies. From medieval and Early Modern poetry, through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries’ fascination with the occult and the exotic, to contemporary depictions of werewolves in new media, these adaptable, mutable and ever resilient creatures have continuously transformed body and meaning to reflect social, cultural and scientific anxieties of their period. This special issue of Revenant seeks to examine werewolves from an all-inclusive interdisciplinary angle to allow for the fullest extent of these creatures’ impact on our cultural consciousness to be examined. Articles, creative pieces and reviews may examine any aspect of the representation of werewolves within the context of worldwide literature, drama, fan cultures, film, television, animation, games and role playing, art, music or material culture from any time period. We welcome any approach, but request that authors minimize jargon associated with any single-discipline studies.

 

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

technological metamorphoses, folklore & mythology, allegory, symbolism, aggression, humanity & bestiality, romance, monstrosity, hybridity, lycanthropy, transformation, nature versus nurture, the environment, natural/supernatural, the abject, hunger & desire, teeth & biting, infection & transmission, possession and/or mind control, split personality, disability, power, death & killing, burial rites, occult, religion, superstition, culture, philosophy, psychology, politics, gender, queer readings, sexuality, race and class.

 

For articles and creative pieces (such as poetry, short stories, flash fiction, videos, artwork and music): please send a 300-500 word abstract and a short biography by 30th November 2015. If your abstract is accepted, the full article (maximum 7000 words, including Harvard referencing) and the full creative piece (maximum 5000 words) will be due 31st March 2016.

 

Additionally, we are seeking reviews of books, films, games, events and art that engage with werewolves (800-1,000 words in length). Please send a short biography and full details of the book you would like to review as soon as possible.

 

Further information, including Submission Guidelines, is available at the journal site: www.revenantjournal.com.

 

Please e-mail submissions to j.hatter@hull.ac.uk and k.a.franck@gmail.com. If emailing the journal directly at revenant@falmouth.ac.uk please quote ‘werewolf issue’ in the subject box.

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Call for a New Steering Group Member

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The PG CWWN is a free and thriving research community, and we invite all postgraduate students whose research is focused on the work of contemporary women writers to get involved. The network hosts a wide variety of networking and training events for PGRs and ECRs working in the field of contemporary women’s writing, including the flagship biennial conference. You can find out more about the network, including details of our previous events on the website: www.pgcwwn.org.
 

The PG CWWN is managed by a group of PhD candidates at a variety of institutions, in the UK and in Europe. By its very nature as a postgraduate-led network, the steering group of the PG CWWN is a lively and motivated team of postgraduate researchers in both the early and latter stages of their doctoral study. At the network’s centre is a passion for contemporary women’s writing, and we therefore seek to bring together a community of emerging scholars from around the world who are engaged in researching this field in various different forms.

We are currently looking to recruit a new steering group member who can be part of a proactive team to continue the work of the PG CWWN (including the website, mailing lists and social media presence), and who will develop new activities and relationships to further the community, as well as work as part of the group to deliver forthcoming conferences and events including the next biennial conference in 2017.

If you are interested in joining then please send an email with a cover letter outlining why you would like to join the steering group and what you think you can bring to the network, as well as a current academic CV, to info@pgcwwn.org by 11th September 2015. You can find out more about the network by visiting our website but if you wish to make any informal enquiries then please do not hesitate to contact us on the above email address. We look forward to hearing from you!

 

The PG CWWN Steering Group (Laura-Jane, Veronika, Krystina, Emma and Jo).

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‘Great Guzzling Gourmands!’: Exploring Men’s Relationship with Food in the Nineteenth Century Novel.

Life Beyond the PhD (Cumberland Lodge) 15th-18th August 2015

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This presentation will form a very brief overview of the research that I am currently conducting into the literary, medical and cultural readings surrounding men’s relationship to food within the early-mid ninenth-century novel. This is a field that has not yet been covered in scholarship, although the link between women and food has been extensively examined. Therefore, my thesis establishes connections between existing research on women, food, consumption, and the presentation of the female body, and the unexplored territory of her male counterpart. I am particularly interested in discovering how the depiction of these themes within sensation and realist novels reinforce or expose the rigid construction of masculinity within this period and how they reflect contemporary cultural discourses. My work also engages with the rising fields of fat studies and this talk will illuminate the ways my research intersects with this burgeoning field.

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Ruth Rendell: CFP for a Special Issue of Contemporary Women’s Writing on Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine. Edited by Ruth Heholt, Fiona Peters and Gina Wisker.

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Ruth Rendell, who has recently died, was one of the most prolific and important female authors of the C20th/21st centuries, achieving many literary awards and honours, plus a Labour peerage. Her literary output, both as Ruth Rendell and Barbara Vine, transcended generic boundaries and conventional assumptions about character, the police procedural novel, class and gender, amongst many of her other concerns.

Rendell’s output can be divided into three categories, bearing in mind that these overlap, shift and change over time: The Wexford series (beginning with From Doon With Death in 1964 up until No Man’s Nightingale in 2013), the stand-alone Rendells, and the arguably more psychologically driven Barbara Vines. Running through all her work, certain themes emerge, including gender, sexuality, crime, poverty, origins, pathology and deviance (especially in the domestic, often suburban sphere), fate and inescapable hereditary, both psychological and physical, and human relationships. Val McDermid notes: ‘Never content with mere description, she illuminated the human condition in all its obsessive complexity in a style that was invariably clear and compelling.’

This special edition aims to mark Rendell’s death with a selection of essays which celebrate her achievements and unique talent – as a writer who never shied away from complex or difficult issues, but who instead shifted the entire focus of the crime fiction genre into a complex study of human beings and their interaction with social and psychological forces.

We invite proposals for articles on any aspect of Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine’s work. CWW seeks to publish essays that reach beyond a reading of a single text in order to challenge existing thinking or extend debates about an author, genre, topic, or theoretical perspective and relate literary analysis to wider cultural and intellectual contexts.

With this in mind topics may include (but are not limited to):

Gender, Class, Age, Family, Marriage, Violence, Death, Authority, The Police, Detection, The Psychological, Race, Homosexuality, Obsession, Poverty, Deviance, The Domestic, The City, The Suburbs.

The deadline for abstracts is 1st September and completed essays of 8000 words will be due on 1st Feb 2016. All essays are subject to peer review and as such publication is not guaranteed.

Please send 300 word abstracts and a short bio to: ruth.heholt@falmouth.ac.uk, f.peters@bathspa.ac.uk and g.wisker@brighton.ac.uk by 1st September 2015.

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Manly Hospitality and Lobster Salads: Public and Private Dining in The Doctor’s Wife

Abstract for the Mary Elizabeth Braddon Centenary Conference: 

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Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s The Doctor’s Wife (1864) conforms to gendered displays of consumption as Isabel can merely pick out the ‘sugar plums’ from books as she is censured when she indulges her physical hungers and so is forced to ‘live upon’ her imagination. While at the same time, the ‘muscular’ George Gilbert is given permission to indulge his appetites in a masculine diet saturated with steak and even Sigismund Smith, the author of ‘half a dozen highly-spiced fictions’, can eat his full of bread and marmalade. However, in contrast to Victorian social codes the male protagonists are more often associated with the providing of food: Sigismund proudly insists on whipping a salad and labours like a ‘butterman’ over his latest novel and Sleaford, when finance allows, will offer ‘Sunday dinners’. The public and private dining experiences of these men sit in opposition, as mismatched cutlery and eating food from pickle jars is placed in a more positive light than the French diner that Sigismund Smith forces George Gilbert to endure.

 

The associations between reading and eating and discussions of ‘feeding’ the imagination at the expense of physical nourishment have already been examined in depth, and so this paper will merely touch on this as a means to contextualise its argument in the introduction. Instead, this paper will place its focus on the depictions of public and private dining in the male sphere and the masculine engagement with hospitality in this novel. Using a variety of contemporary sources, it will explore the extent of middle-class Victorian men’s engagement with the culinary arts. It will also engage with the representation of class through food and dining experiences as the French restaurant dinner is pitted against homely bread-and-cheese. This will lead into a brief discussion of the tensions represented through the use of French versus English cuisines.